Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Effectiveness for Mental Health Treatment

CBT (Cognitive behavioral therapy) is a widespread type of talk therapy known as psychotherapy. You work with a mental health consultant, a psychotherapist, or a therapist in a structured means, attending a limited session. CBT helps you be aware of negative or inaccurate thinking so you can view difficult situations more clearly and react to them more usefully. CBT can be a beneficial tool, alone or in collection with other therapies in dealing with mental health disorders, like PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), depression, or an eating disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy can be a beneficial tool to help anyone understand how to manage stressful life circumstances better. How Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work? Cognitive behavioral therapy treats a broad range of problems. It is frequently the preferred kind of psychotherapy because it can help you specify and cope with particular challenges. It commonly requires fewer sessions than other kinds of therapy and is accomplished in a structured way. CBT is a helpful tool for dealing with emotional challenges. For instance, it may help you: Prevent a relapse of mental disease symptoms Manage chronic physical symptoms Deal with a mental illness when medications are not a good option Manage symptoms of mental disease Learn better ways to communicate Learn methods for coping with stressful life circumstances Cope with a medical disease Specify ways to manage emotions Resolve relatio…
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Substance Use or Mental Illness, Which Comes First?

The fact that substance use is more common among adults with mental health issues makes sense when you consider addiction expert Jean Kilbourne’s words. “Addiction begins with the hope that something "out there" can instantly fill up the emptiness inside.” On that note, how likely is it we are all addicted to something? Whether to food, sex, or drugs, status, money, or praise. Choosing to use our unhealthy habits to fill up our emptiness inside, to cover up our emotions. Choosing to numb out rather than reach out. If that is the case, what would happen if we took time to dig deep to identify the cause of our emptiness, perhaps we could begin to heal. Absolving the desire to escape into our addictions and also resolving the internal turmoil of mental illness. Perhaps lowering the statistics of substance use we are seeing today.     The data Data from 2018 finds 57.8 million American adults are living with a mental and/or substance use disorder (SUD). Broken down further, 47.6 million have a mental illness, 19.3 million are facing substance abuse, and 9.2 million adults are living with both. Among adolescents, at least 358,000 have a SUD together with depression. Numbers trending upward well before the pandemic. As mental health continues to take a major toll in the time of COVID-19, it seems logical to assume substance use disorders will also ascend. Current results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), indicates rates o…
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