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Overcoming The Long-Term Use of Hydrocodone

Hydrocodone is an opioid pain medication that is often prescribed to relieve moderate to severe pain. While hydrocodone can be effective in managing pain, it is also highly addictive and can lead to physical dependence and addiction if misused or abused.

Hydrocodone addiction is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that can have a devastating impact on a person’s life. Individuals suffering from hydrocodone addiction experience hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms ranging from physical to psychological.¬†

Types of hydrocodone

The different types of hydrocodone can vary in terms of the dosage, the duration of the effects, and the intended use. Some of the most common types of hydrocodone include:

Immediate-release hydrocodone: This type of hydrocodone is designed to provide quick pain relief and is often prescribed for acute pain. Immediate-release hydrocodone is typically taken every four to six hours.

Extended-release hydrocodone: This type of hydrocodone is designed to provide long-lasting pain relief and is often prescribed for chronic pain. Extended-release hydrocodone is typically taken every 12 hours.

Hydrocodone combination products: Hydrocodone is often combined with other pain medications, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or aspirin. These combination products can be effective in managing pain but also increase the risk of liver damage or stomach bleeding.

Liquid hydrocodone: This form of hydrocodone is typically prescribed for children or individuals who have difficulty swallowing pills. Liquid hydrocodone is available in various strengths and is taken by mouth.

Hydrocodone with homatropine: This combination product is used to treat coughs and is not typically used for pain management. Homatropine is added to hydrocodone to discourage misuse or abuse.

Signs and symptoms

Some of the common signs and symptoms of hydrocodone use include:

Drowsiness: Hydrocodone can cause drowsiness or a feeling of being sedated. This is one of the most common hydrocodone side effects.

Nausea and vomiting: Some individuals may experience nausea or vomiting as a result of taking hydrocodone.

Constipation: Hydrocodone can cause constipation, which can be uncomfortable or painful.

Dizziness: Long term use of hydrocodone can cause dizziness or lightheadedness, which can increase the risk of falls or accidents.

Respiratory depression: Hydrocodone can slow down breathing, which can be dangerous or even life-threatening in some cases.

Mood changes: Hydrocodone can cause mood changes, such as depression, anxiety, or irritability.

Itching: intense Itching is also a common hydrocodone side effect. Some individuals may experience itching or skin rash as a result of taking hydrocodone.

Tolerance: Over time, individuals who take hydrocodone may develop a tolerance to the medication, meaning that they need higher doses to achieve the same effect.

Withdrawal symptoms: Individuals who develop a dependence on hydrocodone may experience withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop using the medication. Long term use of hydrocodone leads to severe withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can include anxiety, insomnia, muscle aches, sweating, and nausea.

Treatment for hydrocodone addiction

Treatment for hydrocodone addiction typically involves a combination of multiple approaches. These include medication-assisted treatment, behavioral therapy, and support from a community of peers and healthcare professionals.

Medication-assisted treatment

Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is a common treatment approach for opioid addiction, including hydrocodone addiction. MAT typically involves the use of medications, such as methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone, to help manage withdrawal symptoms and reduce hydrocodone abuse. These medications work by binding to the same receptors in the brain that hydrocodone binds to, reducing withdrawal symptoms and cravings without producing the same euphoric effects.

Methadone

Methadone is a long-acting opioid medication that is often used in medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction, including side effects of hydrocodone. Methadone can help to reduce withdrawal symptoms and cravings, allowing individuals to focus on their recovery.

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that is also used in medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction, including hydrocodone addiction. Buprenorphine can help to reduce¬† long term effects of hydrocodone and cravings, while also producing less of a “high” than other opioids.

Naltrexone

Naltrexone is a medication that blocks the effects of opioids, including hydrocodone. Naltrexone lowers the cravings for hydrocodone and prevents hydrocodone abuse.

Behavioral therapy

Behavioral therapy is a critical component of treatment for hydrocodone addiction. Behavioral therapy can help individuals to identify and address the underlying factors that contribute to their addiction. Some common types of behavioral therapy used in the treatment of hydrocodone addiction include:

Cognitive-behavioral therapy

CBT is a type of therapy that helps individuals to identify and change negative patterns of thinking and behavior that contribute to their addiction and treat side effects of hydrocodone.

Motivational interviewing

MI is a type of therapy that helps individuals to explore their motivations for recovery and develop a plan for achieving their goals.

Contingency management

CM is a type of therapy that uses rewards, such as vouchers or prizes, to encourage positive behaviors and reinforce abstinence from hydrocodone.

Support groups

Support groups can be an important source of support and encouragement for individuals in recovery from hydrocodone addiction. Support groups such as Narcotics Anonymous (NA) and SMART Recovery offer a safe and supportive environment for individuals to share their experiences, gain insight from others in recovery, and receive support from peers and trained professionals. Many support groups also offer online meetings, making it easier for individuals to connect with others in recovery from the comfort of their own home.

Inpatient treatment

In some cases, inpatient treatment may be necessary to manage severe hydrocodone side effects or to provide a structured environment for individuals in early recovery. Inpatient treatment typically involves 24-hour medical supervision and intensive therapy and support.

Outpatient treatment

Outpatient treatment may be appropriate for individuals with less severe addiction or who have completed inpatient treatment. Outpatient treatment typically involves regular therapy sessions and support group meetings, allowing individuals to continue working or attending school while in recovery for hydrocodone abuse.

Conclusion 

In conclusion, treatment for hydrocodone addiction typically involves a combination of medication-assisted treatment, behavioral therapy, and support from a community of peers and healthcare professionals. If you or someone you know is struggling with hydrocodone addiction, it is important to seek professional help to overcome the addiction and achieve long-term recovery.

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